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Broken neck / Headstock

Repair work is a difficult and highly skilled service for any guitar technician to provide. The most common repair is a broken neck or head stock. Luckily, it often looks a lot worse than it is! My first assessment is the nature of the break - if it is clean enough and with enough surface area then it can be quite easily glued back into place. The most time consuming and tricky part is repairing the 'finish' (paint and lacquer) and so the cost of a repair is largely determined by the quality required.


New resin nut or saddle

Don't confuse resin with plastic. Plastic nuts and saddles are the horrible, soft, bendy specimens found on very low quality instruments but many people call the resin nuts found on, for example, Epiphone and Yamaha guitars 'plastic' - they are not. Resin nuts are actually very hard wearing and I highly recommend them. In fact I have begun making custom resin nuts for Gibson guitars to replace the original Corian nuts (they are notoriously soft.....yeah, I know, you pay a lot for a Gibson!...).

Prices vary significantly as some replacement plastic nuts and saddles are pre-shaped but still need some sort of alteration to be fitted correctly and to restore your guitar to how it was, thereby needing accurate fitting and slot cutting. Other resin nuts have to be hand made from a 'nut blank', essentially being completely custom made. My prices only cover basic replacement and so, especially on an electric guitar or bass, if you want the intonation to be correct you need to combine the fitting with a setup.


New bone nut or saddle

Custom made from a high quality bone blank. This is for a basic replacement and, especially on an electric guitar or bass, if you want the intonation to be correct you need to combine the fitting with a setup.

Note - there are pre-cut bone nuts and saddles on the market, which would be cheaper to install. I find the quality of the bone used in these is inconsistent and often of a poor quality, therefore I don't offer these as it defeats the purpose of having bone as a nut or saddle material. Also, I have come to the conclusion that bone is not the best material for nuts. I will be writing an article to explain my views, asap.


Other repair work

Due to the rather unpredictable nature of snapped wood, I can only give prices on inspection of the damage. I will be happy to examine a damaged guitar and give a free, no-obligation quote. The cost really depends on the extent and type of damage and so each job is quoted on an individual basis.